The Artistry of Sheena Norquay, Part 4 — Seabird Collection

We have arrived at the final day of our series celebrating the work of textile artist Sheena Norquay. Today is all about her Seabird Collection, a gorgeous array of colors in Auriful 80wt threads. The colours were inspired by puffins, oystercatchers, herring gulls, and black headed gulls.  Their feathers are black and white with added greys for the gulls. The yellow, orange, red, pink and navy blue/grey were inspired by the colours of their beaks and legs.

We are absolutely head over heels for this one and couldn’t have asked for a better showcase of our new 80wt threads.

The colours are:
Black 2692, Dark Grey 2630, Medium Grey 2605, Light Blue/Grey 2600, White 2024
Yellow 1135, Orange 1154, Red 2255, Navy Blue/Grey 1158, Dull Pink 2375

Please visit The Artistry of Sheena Norquay, Part 1 for more details + the full interview with Sheena.

GIVEAWAY
To enter-to-win the Seabird Collection by Sheena Norquay, please leave us a comment on this post letting us know which of Sheena’s pieces below is your favorite and why. Entry will close at 11:59pm on Friday, August 18 and a winner will be announced here on Saturday, August 19. This giveaway is open to all of our International friends!


INTERVIEW (con.)
The Seabird Collection is your latest release, available since April of this year, and it features our new 80wt thread. What did you like most about working with the 80wt?

80 weight thread is very versatile. When piecing, I take a small stitch such as 1.5 or 2 and press the seams open. This gives a smooth ride when quilting over a seam and the small stitches help prevent wadding fibres popping through the seam.

Secondly, it is great for free machine embroidered small details such as the birds. I embroider the bodies of the birds on to cotton organdie which is inserted in an embroidery ring. The birds are then appliqued either by machine or hand to the seascape and the excess organdie cut from around the body shapes. The 80 thread is then used for embroidering tiny details like beaks and legs, although sometimes if the details are really small, I hand stitch the eyes, beaks and legs with one or two lengths of 80 thread. I use a wrapping stitch for the legs and this gives them a more 3 d effect because of the stitches pulling from side to side.

For larger birds which are hand appliqued like the “Three Puffy Puffins,”  “ Two Black-Headed Gulls,” or both oystercatcher pieces, ”Two Oystercatchers on Sand” and “Three Oystercatchers on Boulders,” I use the 80 thread for needle turned hand applique. The thread is so fine you can’t see the stitches.

I have also used the 80 thread for hand embroidered trapunto and have stitched with 2 colours of threads in the needle on the top section of “Pop Ups and Sink Holes,” which was inspired by a drain cover. The bottom section, which has the sink holes, was free motion quilted with 80 threads.  There are 2 colours in each sink hole in every second row.

Finally, the 80 thread works really well if I don’t want the actual quilting stitches to be too prominent, but I want them to create an indented, fine line; or if I am free motion quilting small patterns such as rock line details on the applique or on the border; or if I am free motion quilting lines which involve back tracking  (“Five Feathers”).

How did you go about selecting colors?
I looked at pictures and my own photos of puffins, oystercatchers, black headed gulls and herring gulls, taking note of the colours of feathers, beaks and legs. It is quite tricky to match the greys in particular to their feathers. Also the legs of oystercatchers seem brighter and more orange at certain times of the year, and yet paler and more of a dusky pink at other times.  Anyhow, I then selected thread colours which were the closest match and looked for fabrics to match the threads.

The collection could almost be split into 2 sets of colours, bright and dull, which can be used separately and for other things as well as seabirds. The blue/white /pink sample and the yellow/red/black sample illustrate how the 80 thread works well with decorative stitches on the machine, especially stitches which are quite dense. The fabric is less inclined to pucker when using the 80 thread.

Do you have a favorite piece made with the threads?
I enjoyed making all the samples but I have at long last, found a thread to stitch fine lines such as those on a feather so I guess “Five Feathers” is my favourite.


Sheena made some amazing samples with the colors of Aurifil 80wt from her Seabird Collection. She was also one of our initial testers for the 80wt thread before our launch  in Fall of 2016. She was kind enough to send us her impressions and her tips and we are ever grateful!

On using Aurifil 80wt for machine stitching:
When using  80wt threads in the machine, I tightened the bobbin tension from the setting I use for 50wt threads. Because my old machine has only vertical spool holders, I put the thread spool in a tall, narrow glass behind the machine so that the thread was coming off from the top, clockwise. The other method I used was to put the thread spool on the upright holder and threaded the thread up through a large safety pin so that the thread was coming off from the top. I used an 11/75 quilting needle. All the small birds were machine embroidered on to cotton organdie in a 6-inch ring so the 80wt thread is good for really small birds. I would use no. 50 thread for embroidering slightly larger ones as the thread covers the surface quicker.

On using Aurifil 80wt for hand stitching:
The 80wt threads were great for hand applique – so smooth to stitch with. I  hand appliqued all the large birds and on some I also embroidered on top of the applique. I also used the 80wt threads to hand stitch fine details on the beaks and legs. I used 2 threads in the needle, both cut and knotted at the end next to the spool. The threads lie better if you do this rather than cut one thread and fold it over and knot it. I think I would probably prefer to use the floss for hand embroidering small details if I am covering an area but the 80wt if I am stitching lines.

PUFFIN TRIPTYCH
Finished at 43 X 57.5cm
Created between September 9, 2016 & December 8, 2016
Total time: 15 hours 40 minutes

Puffin Triptych by Sheena Norquay

The puffins were free motion embroidered on to cotton organdie. The 2 on the left were hand appliqued with edges turned in which gives a better result than the pair on the right which were machine appliqued. The machine edge gives a hard, incised line. The beaks and legs were hand stitched with yellow 1135, red 2255, navy blue/grey 1158 and orange 1154. The sky, water, and borders were free motion quilted using light blue/grey 2600 and 1158 navy blue/grey. Cliffs were quilted with medium grey 2605.

Detail of Puffin Triptych by Sheena Norquay

THREE PUFFY PUFFINS
Finished at 52.5 x 43.5cm
Created between September 14, 2016 & December 8, 2016
Total time: 26 hours 40 minutes

The puffins were hand appliqued with white 2024 and black 2692 and have an extra layer of polyester wadding behind them to puff them out. Faces, beaks and legs were fabric painted and hand stitched (2 threads in the needle) with red 2255, yellow 1135, orange 1154, and navy blue/grey 1158.

The background is machine pieced, hand appliqued, and free motion quilted with 50wt threads.

TWO OYSTERCATCHERS ON SAND
Finished at 53.5 x 44cm
Created between September 8, 2016 & December 8, 2016
Total time: 19 hours 35 minutes

Two Oystercatchers on Sand by Sheena Norquay

The oystercatchers were hand appliqued and free machine embroidered on to a layer of wadding using black 2692 and white 2014 threads. Eyes, beaks and legs were fabric painted. Beaks and legs were then machine embroidered on to a layer of wadding using red 2255 and pink 2375.

Detail of Two Oystercatchers on Sand by Sheena Norquay

The background was machine pieced and free motion quilted using 50wt threads.

THREE OYSTERCATCHERS ON BOULDERS
Finished at 54.5 X 44.5cm
Created between September 14, 2016 & December 8, 2016
Total time: 23 hours 25 minutes

Three Oystercatchers on Boulders by Sheena Norquay

The oystercatchers were hand appliqued with 80wt black 2692 and white 2024. The boulders were also hand appliqued using pink 2375, light grey 2600, mid grey 2605 and dark grey 2630. Beaks and legs were fabric painted and free machine embroidered using red 2255 and pink 2375. The oystercatchers and boulders were free motion quilted using same colours.

Water was free motion quilted using 80wt blue 2725 which is not in the collection.

THREE OYSTERCATCHERS, 2 BLACK HEADED GULLS AND WAVES WITH WHITE BORDERS 
Finished at 43.5 x 27.5cm
Created between September 26, 2016 & December 8, 2016
Total time: 16 hours 55 minutes

Three Oystercatchers, two black headed gulls by Sheena Norquay

The birds were free machine embroidered on to cotton organdie using black 2692, white 2024, and mid grey 2605. Legs and beaks were hand stitched using red 2255 and pink 2375. The background was machine pieced with some fabric painting and free motion quilted using 1158 navy/grey, 2024 white, 2605 mid grey, 2630 dark grey, and 2600 light grey.

Detail of Three Oystercatchers, two black headed gulls by Sheena Norquay

BLACK HEADED GULL, TWO OYSTERCATCHERS WITH NAVY BORDERS
Finished at 43.5 x 58.5cm
Created between September 26, 2016 & November 22, 2016
Total time: 15 hours 5 minutes

Black headed gull, two oystercatchers by Sheena Norquay

The birds were free machine embroidered on to cotton organdie and hand appliqued to the background using white 2024 and black 2692. The legs and beaks were hand stitched using red 2255 and pink 2375. The background was machine pieced,  hand appliqued and free motion quilted using mid grey 2605, navy/grey 1158, white 2024, light blue/grey 2600.

FIVE FEATHERS
Finished at 63 x 26.5cm
Created between November 18, 2016 & December 8, 2016
Total time: 13 hours 25 minutes

Five Feathers by Sheena Norquay

This pieces was inspired by seagull feathers collected on walks. The feathers were free machine embroidered on to cotton organdie which was then laid on top of white cotton and 2 layers of wadding (thin polyester thermore and Hobbs 80/20 cotton/polyester), and free motion quilted. Colours used were black 2692, dark grey 2630, mid grey 2605, light blue/grey 2600, and white 2024.

POP UPS  1
Finished at 32 X 32cm
Created between November 22, 2016 & December 1, 2016
Total time: 11 hours 15 minutes

This piece was inspired by a photo of a drain cover which one of Sheena’s friends asked her to take. She suggested a challenge to use it as inspiration for stitching something. Sheena happened to have bought a bath mat which had holes in it and used it for printing a background of 7 x 7 holes, the same as the drain cover, on to a piece of calico. She then pieced a black border and tacked a bit of wadding behind the holes. She free machine embroidered circles in the round holes using the colours from the Seabird collection and trimmed away the wadding around the stitching. A layer of wadding and backing was added and free motion quilted following the lines of the printing and composing decorative circles on the black border.


ABOUT SHEENA
WebsiteFacebook

Sheena Norquay was born on the Orkney Islands, just off the Northern tip of Scotland. Though she began sewing as a child, it wasn’t until attending University in Aberdeen to gain a B.Ed degree that she truly dove into the world of sewing, quilting, and textiles. The degree included 2-dimensional design in textiles which inspired her interest in exploring the artistic potential of threads and fabrics.

Having been a Primary School teacher in Inverness for 30 years, Sheena is now a freelance quilting teacher and teaches workshops locally, all over the UK, and sometimes abroad. She also writes articles for magazines and her quilts have been featured in several books.

Sheena’s work has been exhibited locally, nationally, and internationally since 1981 and she has won many awards in competitive quilt shows. She sells her work, cards and postcards of her work, and also accept commissions.

Text courtesy of Sheena Norquay. Images copyright 2016 Sheena Norquay.

The Artistry of Sheena Norquay, Part 3 — Scottish Highlands Collection

Sheena Norquay’s Scottish Highlands Collections were inspired by the colours of mountains, forests, moorlands, and lochs of the Scottish Highlands as well as native animals such as Highland cows, Red squirrels and Red deer.

The colors are rich and vibrant and well represented in 2 small boxes — 1 in 50wt and 1 in Aurifloss.

The colours are:
2309 (cream), 2612 (pale blue/grey), 2566 (light mauve), 6735 (dark mauve), 2885 (dark green), 1246 (grey), 2775 (dark blue), 2155 (rust brown), 2975 (ochre), & 1147 (light green).

Please visit The Artistry of Sheena Norquay, Part 1 for more details + the full interview with Sheena.

GIVEAWAY
To enter-to-win the two Scottish Highlands collections by Sheena Norquay, please leave us a comment on this post letting us know which of Sheena’s pieces below is your favorite and why. Entry will close at 11:59pm on Friday, August 18 and a winner will be announced here on Saturday, August 19. This giveaway is open to all of our International friends!


INTERVIEW (con.)
Your Scottish Highlands Collection is available in both 50wt and Aurifloss — what are your favorite ways to combine the two thread weights into one piece of art?
I like using the Aurifloss first to hand embroider shapes, animals or sections of landscapes. Colours can be blended together as already explained using 2 – 6 strands of 2 or more colours. The more colours you use, the more subtle and “muddy” the colours become and this is useful when stitching something pictorial. It is a bit like painting with the threads.  If I am stitching a grid or line of shapes I usually take the more orderly, rigid, mathematical approach. Whatever I am embroidering, I usually do it on to a layer of wadding, either wool or polyester.

Once the hand embroidery is completed, I trim away excess wadding around shapes close to the stitching before tacking ( basting)  this to a layer of 80/20 cotton/polyester wadding (batting). The free motion quilting is then done with the no. 50 threads and the embroidered shapes pop up – for example the triangle shaped pieces or “Red Squirrel.” It is useful to have the same colour of threads as I used for the embroidery.  Sometimes I add more hand stitched details with the floss such as on the foreground of “Sheep at Loch Ness.”


Sheena made a series of samples to showcase the threads in her Scottish Highlands Collections — 50wt & Floss.

SAMPLE 3
Finished at 20 x 21cm
Created between December 21, 2015 & February 2, 2016
Total time: 7 hours 15 minutes

by Sheena Norquay

Four strands of 9 single colours were embroidered using a detached chain stitch on a pieced 9-patch block and Thermore wadding to create nine triangles which represent mountains. The border was embroidered in zig zags with the 10th colour before a second layer of 80/20 cotton/polyester wadding was added. It was free motion quilted using 50wt thread.

SAMPLE 5
Finished at 22.5 x 50.5cm
Created between December 29, 2015 & January 26, 2016
Total time: 23 hours 20 minutes

Each row of triangles is a 4 step blend from one colour to another using 4 strands of floss. (4a, 3a + 1b, 2a + 2b, 1a + 3b) All 10 colours in the Scottish Highlands collection were used.

TWEED CUSHION WITH TRIANGLES
Finished at 37 X 37cm
Created between January 3, 2016 & February 18, 2016
Total time: 13 hours 40 minutes

Five small pieces of tweed were pieced together — each piece has 3 triangle shapes  embroidered with 4 strands of Aurifloss using a 2 step colour blend ( 2a, 1a+1b 2b).  Grey/black herringbone tweed was stitched around the embroidered rectangles to form a cushion cover. The outline of a large triangle was embroidered with slanting stitches to match the weave of the tweed. Each row of stitches has 2 strands of cotton floss and forms a 2 step colour blend.

The cushion cover was quilted with straight lines following the weave of the fabric using Aurifil 50wt and the walking foot. There is an extra layer of wadding behind the large triangle (wool) with the main layer being 80/20 cotton/ polyester.

FLYING TRIANGLES

CLUTCH BAG

POSTCARDS FROM THE SCOTTISH HIGHLANDS
These samples are painted, pieced, hand appliqued, and embroidered with colours from the Scottish Highlands collection of cotton floss and free motion quilted using Aurifil 50wt threads in the same colours.

HIGHLAND COWS  
Finished at 30 x 25cm
Created between January 4, 2016 & February 9, 2016
Total time: 14 hours 30 minutes

Detail of Highland Cows by Sheena Norquay

Inspired by a photo Sheena took of 2 Highland cows near Inverness, this piece was made with fabric painting and hand embroidery using cotton floss threads from the Scottish Highlands collection. It was free motion quilted using Aurifil 50wt.

LONE STAG  
Finished at 29 x 25cm
Created between January 15, 2016 & February 11, 2016
Total time: 12 hours 40 minutes

Lone Stag by Sheena Norquay

The mountain was inspired by a photo Sheena took from the train south of Aviemore. She loved the patterns on the mountain and it is an area where one can often see red deer. The piece was created using fabric painting and hand embroidery with 2 colours of cotton floss from the Scottish Highlands collection. It was then free motion quilted using Aurifil 50wt.

GREEN TREELINES AND TARTAN TWEED
Finished at 31.5 x 32cm
Created between January 18, 2016 & February 4, 2016
Total time: 17 hours 30 minutes

Green Treelines and Tartan Tweed by Sheena Norquay

This piece was inspired by a photo taken from the train between Inverness and Perth. The wind was whipping the snow up into the sky, a sight Sheena had not seen before and she was attracted to the contrast between the trees and the lines on the mountain. It was fabric painted and hand embroidered using cotton floss from the Scottish Highlands collection. The border is wool tartan. Couched threads are 3 strands of Aurifil Wool twisted together and hand stitched.


ABOUT SHEENA
WebsiteFacebook

Sheena Norquay was born on the Orkney Islands, just off the Northern tip of Scotland. Though she began sewing as a child, it wasn’t until attending University in Aberdeen to gain a B.Ed degree that she truly dove into the world of sewing, quilting, and textiles. The degree included 2-dimensional design in textiles which inspired her interest in exploring the artistic potential of threads and fabrics.

Having been a Primary School teacher in Inverness for 30 years, Sheena is now a freelance quilting teacher and teaches workshops locally, all over the UK, and sometimes abroad. She also writes articles for magazines and her quilts have been featured in several books.

Sheena’s work has been exhibited locally, nationally, and internationally since 1981 and she has won many awards in competitive quilt shows. She sells her work, cards and postcards of her work, and also accept commissions.

Text and images courtesy of Sheena Norquay.

The Artistry of Sheena Norquay, Part 2 — The Beach Collection

Sheena Norquay’s Beach Collection was inspired by the colours of shells, stones, pebbles, sea glass and sand. It is a box of 12 Large Spools of 50wt thread.

The Colours are:
2524 (light blue/purple), 2564 (light pink/lilac), 4150 (yellow variegated)
1248 (dark blue/purple), 2311 (cream), 2375 (peach)
2610 ((dark grey/blue), 2312 (light beige), 2340 (light rust)
2615 (light grey), 2805 (light turquoise), 2326 (dark beige)

Please visit The Artistry of Sheena Norquay, Part 1 for more details + the full interview with Sheena.

GIVEAWAY
To enter-to-win The Beach Collection by Sheena Norquay, please leave us a comment on this post letting us know which of Sheena’s pieces below is your favorite and why. Entry will close at 11:59pm on Friday, August 18 and a winner will be announced here on Saturday, August 19. This giveaway is open to all of our International friends!

INTERVIEW (con.)
Tell us about The Beach Collection. What inspired the designs and how did you go about selecting the colors?
One of my favourite things to do when I am not stitching, is to go beachcombing. I have collected shells, stones, seaglass, fragments of pottery etc over the years and so I looked at my collection for colour inspiration for the Beach Collection. The rocks and stones on the beaches where I go in Orkney are mainly of sandstone which has warm, gentle, subtle colours. The colours of some shells, seaglass and other stones are cooler but still soft. I tried to have a combination of warm and cool, light and dark in the collection.

Do you have a favorite project made with the collection?
I enjoyed making all of the samples but I think the wholecloth “Periwinkles in a Spin” shows off all the threads in the collection to best effect.


Sheena made a series of samples to showcase the threads in her Beach Collection.

PEBBLE WAVE GRID 
Finished at 59 x 86cm
Created between January 17, 2016 & February 2, 2016
Total time: 29 hours 20 minutes

Pebblewave Grid by Sheena Norquay

Strip pieced using 12 colours of cotton fabrics matching the threads in the beach collection. Pebbles are printed and painted horizontally in shallow curves echoing the shape of the blue wave at the top. The curved horizontal lines of the grid are satin stitched. Wave shape at the top is twin needled, free motion quilted using swinging c curves and satin stitched in vertical lines in the same colours as the fabrics. Pebble shapes on the calico section at the bottom are fabric painted to match the fabrics and the backgrounds are quilted with colours matching the pebbles and adjacent strips. Backgrounds of the coloured strips are free motion quilted in pebble designs in horizontal bands using each of the 12 colours in the Beach collection.

Pebblewave Detail by Sheena Norquay

SCALLOPS
Finished at 39 x 88cm
Created between January 13, 2016 & January 19, 2016
Total time: 22hours 50 minutes

Scallops by Sheena Norquay

Squares were pieced in colours to match the Beach Collection. The background has 3 different cream and beige fabrics. Scallop shell shapes were free motion quilted in repeat, half drop, random, and overlapping patterns. Shells on the coloured fabric were painted with pearlescent paint. The background was quilted in 12 colours in different sizes of circles and curved lines.  Sheena used 2 layers of wadding – polyester Thermore + 80/20 cotton/polyester.

Details of Scallops by Sheena Norquay

PERIWINKLES IN A SPIN
Finished at 61 x 42cm
Created between January 21, 2016 & February 12, 2016
Total time: 15 hours

Detail of Periwinkles in a Spin by Sheena Norquay

Inspired by periwinkle shells. 12 small shell shapes are free motion quilted using Aurifil cotton no. 50 in 12 Beach Collection colours. The shells form a spiral which is then continued in swinging C curves between 2 lines to complete a larger periwinkle shape. Lines separating swinging C curves are satin stitched. The background is quilted in a water pattern. I used 50/50 cotton/polyester wadding behind the small shells, a layer of thin polyester Thermore behind the large, shell shape and 80/20 cotton/polyester for the main layer. It was quilted on a 1008 Bernina machine.

PERIWINKLE SPIRAL PATTERNS
Finished at 61 x 42cm
Created between January 23, 2016 & February 13, 2016
Total time: 13 hours 15minutes

Periwinkle Spiral Patterns by Sheena Norquay

This piece was inspired by the periwinkle shell and its spiral shape. The shell is split into 12 sections and in each section Sheena free motion quilted 12 different spiral patterns using 12 different colours of Aurifil cotton no. 50 from the Beach Collection. She used 2 layers of wadding – 80/20  cotton/polyester + Hobbs Wool Tuscany.

 

PERIWINKLE BORDERS
Finished at 35.5 x 49.5cm
Created between January 13, 2016 & January 27, 2016
Total time: 12 hours 15 minutes

Detail of Periwinkle Borders by Sheena Norquay

Four sizes of periwinkle shapes were free motion quilted in horizontal borders in 12 colours of Aurifil no. 50 threads from the Beach collection. Backgrounds were free motion quilted in water, pebble, and sand patterns. Borders were separated with satin stitch. Sheena used cotton sateen and two layers of wadding – polyester thermore + 80/20 cotton/polyester.

 

BLUE PEBLEWASH WITH MUSSELS  
Finished at 42.5 X 60.5cm
Created between January 1, 2016 and February 21, 2016

Blue Pebblewash with Mussels by Sheena Norquay

The blue pebbles were printed with a bathmat and Jacquard Lumiere fabric paints. Mussel shells were hand painted and hand appliqued. The water was hand painted. Cotton organdy was free motion embroidered, appliqued and quilted in wave and bubble shapes. Sheena used 2 layers of wadding – thin thermore polyester + 80/20 cotton/polyester. The piece was free motion quilted with Aurifil cotton no. 50 threads using some colours from the Beach collection. The patterns created by water on the sand were inspired by photos that Sheena took at Nairn Beach and the shells were inspired by some that she has collected from various beaches.

Detail of Blue Pebblewash with Mussels by Sheena Norquay


ABOUT SHEENA
WebsiteFacebook

Sheena Norquay was born on the Orkney Islands, just off the Northern tip of Scotland. Though she began sewing as a child, it wasn’t until attending University in Aberdeen to gain a B.Ed degree that she truly dove into the world of sewing, quilting, and textiles. The degree included 2-dimensional design in textiles which inspired her interest in exploring the artistic potential of threads and fabrics.

Having been a Primary School teacher in Inverness for 30 years, Sheena is now a freelance quilting teacher and teaches workshops locally, all over the UK, and sometimes abroad. She also writes articles for magazines and her quilts have been featured in several books.

Sheena’s work has been exhibited locally, nationally, and internationally since 1981 and she has won many awards in competitive quilt shows. She sells her work, cards and postcards of her work, and also accept commissions.

Text and images courtesy of Sheena Norquay.

270 Shades of (Everything Under the Sun including) Grey

One of the things we love most about Quilt Market is the opportunity to showcase some of the gorgeous work of some very talented designers. It’s particularly exciting when we have new pieces to debut, like with this stunner by Sari Thomas of Sariditty. “270 Shades of (Everything Under the Sun including) Grey” features our 40wt thread in, you guessed it, all 270 colors! When Sari presented the idea earlier this year, we just knew it would be a beauty.

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QuiltCon 2017 — Savannah, GA

We’re just getting back and settled in from a spectacular five days in beautiful, historic, and fascinating Savannah, Georgia.  There is a certain perceived expectation when you think of “The South”, particularly when you think of Savannah.  Nothing about this city disappointed me. Not even the weather- especially because I arrived the day after it stopped raining. What luck!

Savannah is the oldest city in Georgia and one of the only surviving cities left after the Civil War.  Some of the houses date back to the 1700s, which is pretty incredible.

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Just imagine the quilts that were made inside those walls!  That certainly brings a whole new level of appreciation for Civil War reproduction fabrics, don’t you think?

Savannah is a very picturesque city, full of manicured lawns, immaculately kept homes and ornate details everywhere you look.  Just walking a few blocks to breakfast took us nearly an hour because we kept stopping to admire the view, take pictures or read the plaques of the various fountains and statues in the squares.

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The Savannah River divides the city from the World Trade Center, where QuiltCon 2017 was held.  There was only one hotel on that side, and if you weren’t staying in it, you had to travel across the river via ferry.  On the first night, the ferry was packed full of quilters and only a few locals.  I doubt they had ever seen so many handmade bags and quilt related t-shirts in one place before!

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We had a great time playing a game with our QuiltCon guests.  The idea was to see who, amongst the three players, could put a puzzle together the fastest.  The fastest got to take home a large spool of thread of their choice; the remaining two took home a small spool of their choice.  Everyone was a winner!

All players were challenged to beat the ‘best time’, which kept getting faster and faster throughout the event. On Sunday morning, we had our fastest participant EVER, not just for QuiltCon. Karen Brown completed the Aurifil Spool puzzle in just 2 minutes & 36 seconds. We were all in awe! Congratulations again to Karen, who is now the excited recipient of a Tula Pink Ultimate Collection — 45 small spools of lucious and colorful thread!

To help celebrate 270 Colors, the incredible quilt by Sheri Cifaldi-Morrill of Whole Circle Studio, we hosted an ongoing social media contest.  Participants had to take a “Selfie” in front of the quilt and post it to Instagram using the hashtag “#270ColorsGiveaway“.  We had over 190 entries and our winners were:

We did also share a daily at-home giveaway so that no one would be excluded!! Thank you again to all who played along!

270 Colors by Sheri Cifaldi-Morrill

Even though we weren’t able to sell our thread in our booth, there was still plenty to be found throughout the show including the booths for: Craft South, Crimson Tate, Andover, Victoria Findlay Wolfe, Marcus FabricsRiley Blake, and more!!

We also loved having a chance to visit with some of our amazing fabric partners. Many of them had interactive booths, giving visitors a chance to design quilt blocks, collect supplies to work on collaborative quilting projects, and more!

Of course, one of my favorite aspects of community events like this, is all of the quilts.  I’m amazed at the diversity on display.  Just when I think I’ve seen it all, when I’ve defined my own personal style, I turn a corner and see something that changes my whole perspective, something that makes me stop and think and admire.  Below are some of my favorites from this year’s show.

And of course, Best In Show, “Bling” by Katherine Jones:

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I’m pretty sure she said it took her over 160 hours to complete the quilt top.  It is ENTIRELY paper-pieced!  Can you imagine??

All-in-all, a great time was had by all.  People left feeling inspired, satisfied, knowledgable.  I think those are the best things to come away with.  And, even though it’s maybe a little sad to leave and go back home to reality, the memories live on and we get to look forward to the next time we can fill our minds with new techniques and skills. We get to fill our hearts with the fun times had with friends that we may have only previous known online.  That’s the beauty of it, really.

Until next time!

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— Kristi, Bradley, Erin, and Alex

The Quilts of Savannah QuiltCon 2017: Piecing Category

piecingwinners

This past weekend, Aurifil traveled to Savannah, the oldest city in Georgia, for QuiltCon, the largest modern quilting show of its kind, presented by the Modern Quilt Guild. We were there to help celebrate 42 remarkable modern quilters with unique and colorful entries in the Piecing Category, a category we’ve proudly sponsored for the last several years.  Personal taste in fabric, color, and design style allows this category to stay completely varied and different.

Alex Veronelli with the First Place Quilt (see below for more info)

Alex Veronelli with the First Place Quilt (see below for more info)

I took photos of every quilt in the category and put together a slideshow to illustrate just how interpretive piecing can be:

The Aurifil Sponsored Piecing Category Winners 

First Place: Marilyn Farquhard, “Ode de Yoshiko”img_2171

Second Place: Miriam Coffey, “Finding the One”

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Third Place: Elaine Poplin, “Vertigo”

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And, my personal favorite: Sarah Sharp, “Folksy Fish”img_2341

After looking at the sheer number of seams in some of these quilts, especially “Folksy Fish”, you can see how important your choice of thread is!  Aurifil 50wt thread is perfect for piecing because it is thin enough to reduce bulky seams (ensuring a more flat quilt top), yet strong enough to ensure that your stitches will stay together.  Even if it’s not an heirloom piece, it will last like it is.

Aurifil would like to congratulate all the entrants in this year’s QuiltCon quilt show! We are so inspired by the work that you do!

To find out more about our different thread weights and how they should be used, please visit our website.


Stay tuned for a full recap of our QuiltCon experience on Monday, March 6! We had so much fun and can’t wait to share it all!

270 Colors Quilt: From Start to Finish

We first met Sheri Cifaldi-Morrill of Whole Circle Studio in the Spring of last year, just after Quilt Market. Hilary Jordan (our social media coordinator) and I spotted a fabulous mini quilt that she’d made featuring none other than Aurifil’s iconic 50wt spools on Instagram. With a rainbow of colors against a stark white background, the mini was striking and it’s no surprise that it caught our attention.

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Sheri’s original mini quilt, So Many Colors, April 2016.

Sheri and Hilary connected on Instagram, which led to an email exchange with me.  We learned that Sheri designed the “So Many Colors” mini quilt as a donation to the Quilt Alliance annual fundraiser in early 2016. The theme was “Playing Favorites” and the mini quilt incorporated her favorite brand of thread, Aurifil, using one of her favorite piecing techniques—foundation paper piecing.

Initially, we weren’t quite sure how we were going to work together, but we knew we wanted to do something fun and impactful in honor of Aurifil’s upcoming 10th Anniversary. After a series of conversations, a whole bunch of exchanged emails and some internal planning, a decision was made. We have absolutely LOVED working with Sheri over the past 8 months. She is creative, thoughtful, incredibly professional, and we couldn’t be happier with the quilt that she created.

We’re thrilled, today, to introduce Sheri to you and to let her debut her quilt in her own words, with a series of stunning process photos to give you all a closer look at how this fabulous masterpiece came together. Thank you Sheri!!


I am so excited to share the process of creating the 270 Colors quilt I created for Aurifil to commemorate and celebrate their tenth anniversary this year. The quilt features all 270 current colors of Aurifil’s 50wt thread!

After playing with different layouts in Adobe Illustrator and then presenting them to the Aurifil team, we decided to proceed with the layout shown below. The placement of colors mimics the arrangement of how the spools are displayed when the drawers are pulled out in the Full Selection Collection Box.

wholecirclestudio_270colors_01_initialdesignI started drafting the pattern and testing while I was waiting for materials from AurifilRobert Kaufman, and The Warm Company to arrive. It was important to me for the spools to be shown at actual size and proportions once all of the pieces were sewn together. Measuring, making diagrams, and sewing prototypes (and then re-testing) helped achieve this.

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Organization was key while making this quilt! I needed to match all 270 colors of thread to corresponding Robert Kaufman Kona® Solids. As soon as the big, beautiful box of Aurifil thread arrived in my studio, I created a spreadsheet in Excel. The color numbers in the spreadsheet are arranged in the same configuration as the thread is in the drawers. Having this tool allowed me to mix and match the thread to the fabric but still be able to return it to its correct location in the box.

Once I was organized, it was time to get down to business — cutting and piecing! Even the scraps were beautiful.

After a very busy month of piecing, I moved on to basting. I used Warm and Natural batting from The Warm Company and LOTS of pins. I tend to use a lot of pins. The process of basting can be tough of my fingers, but using so many pins ensures that all of the layers remain smooth. I rarely have puckers or shifting while quilting.

The piecing and quilting was done on my Juki 2010, with Aurifil 50wt. I used my walking foot to quilt the orange spools (color: 1104) and the background (color: 2024). I free motion quilted the “thread” portions of all 270 using the cross wound pattern found on the actual Aurifil spools as inspiration. Instead of marking, I positioned pins as a guide for each spool. The spreadsheet I had set up also helped me keep on track while quilting. I highlighted each number as it was quilted. It also helped to create some test strips so I could practice my free motion quilting before digging in.

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Check out this video clip demonstrating the free motion quilting process:

After a month of quilting, I was in the home stretch. It was down to burying threads, squaring up the quilt, binding, and sewing on a sleeve.

The final quilt measures approximately 70″ x 85″. The spools are the actual size of a large 50wt Aurifil spool and are spaced 2″ apart. The quilt is finished with a binding that matches Aurifil’s iconic orange spool (using Robert Kaufman Kona® Tangerine) and the back matches the blue in Aurifil’s logo (Kona® Water).

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Happy 10th Anniversary Aurifil USA! I am honored to have had the opportunity to design and produce this quilt to help you commemorate this big milestone.

Be sure to check out the quilt as it travels to QuiltCon, 2017 Quilt Markets and with Alex when he visits a local quilt shop near you.

— Sheri Cifaldi-Morrill
www.wholecirclestudio.com


Find Sheri Online
WebsiteBlogFacebookInstagramPinterestTwitter

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photo courtesy of Craftsy

Sheri Cifaldi-Morrill is a designer, maker and self-taught modern quilter. Sheri graduated from the University of Connecticut with a BFA in Graphic Design. She has twenty years of experience leading creative teams to create award winning identities, products and environments. She has worked in small design studios, a dot com and the exhibit department at a children’s museum.

Sheri’s quilts have gained national recognition including awards from QuiltCon, Quilt Week/Paducah and the Quilt Alliance. They have been featured at art centers and galleries across the country. In addition to publishing her patterns, her quilts have been featured in national publications such as Modern Patchwork. She also teaches quilting techniques.

Sheri was awarded the first annual Craftsy Quilt Designer Fellowship in 2016. This fellowship enabled her to debut Whole Circle Studio’s first booth at International Quilt Market in Houston, Texas in October 2016.

Sheri works from her home studio in the suburbs of New Haven, Connecticut—a hop, skip and jump away from New York City. She loves to chat about design and quilts. Contact her at sheri@wholecirclestudio.com.

[Images, biography & guest post text courtesy of Sheri Cifaldi-Morrill]

Showcase Sunday {2.12}

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Welcome back to Showcase Sunday! We are already so inspired by all of the new things you’ve been creating so far this year! We love having a forum to showcase the beautiful work that all of you do and can’t get enough of the lovely things that you’re making, so keep tagging us and sharing your work and we’ll feature some of our favorites here every other Sunday. Don’t forget to check in on Facebook & Instagram to see more! Happy Stitching:).

(Click on any image below to visit the artist’s Instagram account for more!)

@zenchicmoda

@zenchicmoda

@yardgrl60

@yardgrl60

@the_tattooed_quilter

@the_tattooed_quilter

@thatcraftaddict

@thatcraftaddict

@sls_fabricshop

@sls_fabricshop

@quiltyhabit

@quiltyhabit

@quiltingjetgirl

@quiltingjetgirl

@quiltbystarlight

@quiltbystarlight

@quiltachusetts

@quiltachusetts

@purlverde

@purlverde

@nq1yearofstitches

@nq1yearofstitches

@mybearpaw

@mybearpaw

@mrssophie2

@mrssophie2

@kareepickett

@kareepickett

@julieschloemer

@julieschloemer

@ivory_spring

@ivory_spring

@itssewscottsdale

@itssewscottsdale

@freebirdquiltingdesigns

@freebirdquiltingdesigns

@colorgirlquilts

@colorgirlquilts

@ablossomedchaos

@ablossomedchaos

Find free patterns, tips, tutorials, and inspiration by following Aurifil on PinterestFacebook, and Instagram. All are updated regularly to provide you with the best the sewing world has to offer!

For more information about Aurifil products, including thread weights, Designer Collections, and where to purchase from your local quilt shop or select online shops, please visit Aurifil.com.

Showcase Sunday {1.29}

showcasesunday1-29

It’s our first  Showcase Sunday of the New Year, so welcome back! We are so looking forward to a creative and inspiring 2017. We love having a forum to showcase the beautiful work that all of you do and can’t get enough of the lovely things that you’re making, so keep tagging us and sharing your work and we’ll feature some of our favorites here every other Sunday. Don’t forget to check in on Facebook & Instagram to see more! Happy Stitching:).

(Click on any image below to visit the artist’s Instagram account for more!)

@quilterpatsloan

@quilterpatsloan

@purlverde

@purlverde

@madbirdtextiles

@madbirdtextiles

@carolasmussen

@carolasmussen

@redbirdquiltco

@redbirdquiltco

@_beckyo_

@_beckyo_

@pieladyquilts

@pieladyquilts

@misterdomestic

@misterdomestic

@purlverde

@purlverde

@yardgrl60

@yardgrl60

@luellabella

@luellabella

@marymenzerdesigns

@marymenzerdesigns

@amandamurphydesign

@amandamurphydesign

@campbell_soup_diary

@campbell_soup_diary

@white-hills-quilts

@white-hills-quilts

@quiltyhabit

@quiltyhabit

@quiltingjetgirl

@quiltingjetgirl

@ebmakery

@ebmakery

@colorgirlquilts

@colorgirlquilts

@taunjalynn

@taunjalynn

@freebirdquiltingdesigns

@freebirdquiltingdesigns

@ladykquilts

@ladykquilts

Find free patterns, tips, tutorials, and inspiration by following Aurifil on PinterestFacebook, and Instagram. All are updated regularly to provide you with the best the sewing world has to offer!

For more information about Aurifil products, including thread weights, Designer Collections, and where to purchase from your local quilt shop or select online shops, please visit Aurifil.com.

Deep Gems by Paula Nadelstern

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Paula Nadelstern‘s Deep Gems collection for Aurifil was prepared as a representation of the vibrant and rich colors typically present within her kaleidoscopic fabric designs. Oranges, reds and pink offset the cool blue and green tones, creating a truly fantastic range. Though these colors work particularly well in partner with Paula’s unique quilting style, they would also be the perfect complement to a variety of quilt projects. The collection features 12 unique colors of the highly versatile 50wt thread.

THREAD COLLECTION DETAILS
Deep Gems
12 Large Spools, 50 wt, 1422yds/each
2145 – 2150 – 2270 – 2260 – 4020 – 2545
5022 – 1147 – 2870 – 2810 – 2735 – 1200

paulanadelstern-deepgems

To view this info on our website, click the image above. For purchasing, please contact your local Aurifil Dealer.

THE INTERVIEW
Can you tell us a bit about yourself and how you first got started in the world of quilting and textiles?
I’m a New Yorker wrapped up in the fabric of city life. In fact, I make my quilts on the same block in the Bronx where I grew up. I settled into full time quilt making by way of the playground park bench. That’s where moms on hiatus from previous lives (I was an Occupational Therapist) hang out and share ideas—like organizing total non-sewists and quilt novices into making a raffle quilt for the local cooperative nursery school, the same one I’d gone to as a toddler. One good group quilt led to another and another. By the time I gave up my place on that bench to the next generation of moms, I had the expertise and repertoire for a comprehensive book on group quilts (Quilting Together, Crown Publishers 1988) and was stitching my way toward a new career. And to this day, over 40 years later, the Nursery moms make an annual raffle quilt.

Who or what has been your greatest creative inspiration?
My interest in things kaleidoscopic began in 1987 when I was struck by a bolt of fabric–a sumptuous, sinfully-expensive, bilaterally symmetrical Liberty of London cotton. Little did I know that purchasing a quarter yard would change my life forever, leading me three years and four quilts later to purchase my first actual state-of-the-art kaleidoscope and join the Brewster Kaleidoscope Society, The BKS is a society of artists who design and create kaleidoscopes, galleries and shops who sell kaleidoscopes and collectors and museums who appreciate and enjoy them.

The amazing first bolt of Liberty of London fabric

The amazing first bolt of Liberty of London fabric

The insight from this anecdote is obvious: buy that piece of fabric no matter how expensive it is. As I peer through the many incredible kaleidoscopes I have garnered over the years, like a sleuth searching for clues, I discover my design inspiration all over again. Who knows what the next turn of the scope will reveal to me or to you?

With hindsight I’ve realized that another factor played strongly in the development of my personal design and technique strategies. Historians have suggested that the block-style method of making quilts evolved in response to the cramped quarters of early American life. My family’s living arrangements in an urban environment created similar considerations that, unwittingly, I resolved in much the same way.

When I started making kaleidoscope quilts, my workspace in our two-bedroom apartment was the forty-inch round kitchen table. (I’m the only person I know who taught her family to eat in front of the TV). I think the reality of limited space helped shape my idiosyncratic style. Instead of the traditional square-shaped-block, my block-style method is based on a triangle because a kaleidoscope is a circular design composed of identical triangular wedges that radiate from a center point. Throughout the design stage, I’m working on a single full-size triangle that is drafted on graph paper and patched from fabric using templates. Whatever I do to one triangle, I simultaneously do to all 6 or 8 or 16. I don’t see the final gestalt until the last seam is sewn.

Do you remember the process of creating your first quilt and how you felt once it was finished?
Lots of teachers on the circuit will tell you about the important female in their early lives who taught them to how to sew, insisting (kindly or not) that all imperfection be repaired. I grew up with a mom who prided herself on not being “fussy”, mended a lot (a habit left over from the Depression) and generously appraised every attempt of mine as either great or good enough. I am not complaining. When, as a young teen, I borrowed her much revered but temperamental second-hand, brand-name sewing machine, the bobbin would jam within minutes. Although this led me to suspect I wasn’t very good at sewing, I returned to it again and again because there is something optimistic about a palette of colorful, tactile fabric.

My matriarchal aunt’s gift to sixteen-year-old me of a steadfast Singer Featherweight©, purchased for $25 at a yard sale and fitted with a single hole throat plate, changed all that. (I used to call it an old machine until I learned it was a year younger than I am.) Together we made my first quilt (a comforter cover really) in 1968 in my college dorm, ripping up my old clothes into 10” squares and sewing them together. I was exceptionally proud of it and so was my mom. Today I work in a 15-by-10-foot studio revamped from my daughter’s former bedroom. Picture ceiling high cupboards stuffed with fabric, drawers overflowing with the paraphernalia quilters collect, 6 feet of design wall, and a Bernina poised for action on a 4-by-6-foot counter.

Paula's prized first quilt

Paula’s prized first quilt

Your book, Fabracadabra, was just released with C&T Publishing. Can you tell us a bit about that process and what you loved most about it?
I’ve been told that I write books pretty much the same way that I make quilts. Fabric by fabric. Choice by choice. In a word, slowly.

The truth is, I’d rather be working on a quilt than writing about it. But it’s not until you write about something that you understand it really well. Breaking down your own creative act, first by identifying your personal strategies, and then by dividing them into a sequence of steps, forces you to reflect on what things aren’t as well as what they are. This exploration steers you in lots of valuable directions. It leads you to the vocabulary needed to articulate your private visual language. It helps you recognize the kinds of mistakes students are likely to make and head them off in class. And sometimes, when you are very lucky, it awakens new ideas, pushing you, the artist, further along your creative path.

fabracadabra

The book demonstrates how quilts made of simple shapes can be transformed into complex-looking quilts that are easy to piece using gorgeous, intricate fabric. Some, but not all, of the quilts are traditional patterns, gift-wrapped with charismatic fabrics.

Do you have a favorite project from the book?
One of my favorite quilts from my new book FABRICADABRA, Simple Quilts, Complex Fabric is the quilt called An Agreement of Butterflies.

I was waiting to give my lecture to the Prairie Quilt Guild in Wichita, KS when a traditional butterfly quilt held up during Show & Tell captured my attention. In a flash, I recognized a kindred pattern capable of showcasing a gazillion symmetrical prints all at once. Choosing the fabrics bewitched me into a flow state, the name for those glorious moments when you’re so energized by the task at hand that time seems immaterial. I made many more 5” x 5” squares than needed.

Closeup of An Agreement of Butterflies by Paula Nadelstern

Closeup of An Agreement of Butterflies by Paula Nadelstern

The collective nouns for various groups of animals and birds amuse me. A shrewdness of apes. A murder of crows. I assumed there’d be one for butterflies but when I couldn’t find it, I made one up. Assembled from forty-nine different fabrics (plus a common butterfly belly and black background equals fifty-one) from my first thirteen fabric collections for Benartex, these diverse colors and prints seem to be in accord — that’s why I called it An Agreement of Butterflies. So, color me speechless when a second internet search, six months after the first one, revealed labels for a multitude of butterflies. A rabble of butterflies. A flutter of butterflies. An equally appealing quilt title, a rainbow of butterflies. But the perfect coincidence, the goose bump laden karmic moment was the phrase: a kaleidoscope of butterflies. It must be true, I Googled it.

An Agreement of Butterflies by Paula Nadelstern

An Agreement of Butterflies by Paula Nadelstern

In your work, you herald the kaleidoscope, a word you say promises ‘surprise and magic, change and chance’. How has this informed your quilting style?
For almost forty years, the kaleidoscope has not only been my design inspiration, it’s also been my classroom. Analyzing not only what a scope is but also what it isn’t has steered me in lots of valuable directions, including toward the fundamental principles of design. I’ve learned to manipulate physical properties like focal point, rhythm and line to inject a feeling of motion into an otherwise static image. But it is the unique qualities synonymous with the kaleidoscope personality that I’m always trying to get to know better. Surprise. Magic. Change. Chance. I’ve learned that to conjure an instant of luminous and fleeting spontaneity, I’ve got to trust in symmetry, rely on detail, commit both random and staged acts of color and understand that the whole will always be greater than the sum of its parts. No matter what my quilts look like in the future, this personal design vocabulary, gleaned through the eyepiece of a kaleidoscope, will take the journey with me.

When did you first discover Aurifil threads and what do you love most about them? Do you have a favorite color/weight?
I’ve been using Aurifil 50 weight for years for piecing. My larger quilts can end up with thousands of seams. I like that I can rely on the combination of delicacy with strength because it helps keep the multitude of seams thin and not bulky.

I’ve used Aurifil 12 in many of the beautiful colors for embroidery and for a big stitch echoing a hand quilting stitch.

Paula at 2013 Quilt Market in Houston

Paula at 2013 Quilt Market in Houston

KALEIDOSCOPIC XXXVIII: Millifiori, 82“x 82“, is my first quilt using only fabric from collections I’ve designed for Benartex and the first one quilted by me on a long arm machine courtesy of APQS. In 2013, I spent Houston Quilt Market in the APQS booth, quilting this extremely patterned piece, mentored by the delightful, generous staff. I think the choice of an olive Aurifil thread was brilliant. I’m fascinated by the effect, the impression that the thread changes colors, chameleon-like, against the multitude of hues in the quilt: golden, green, dark, light.

KALEIDOSCOPIC XXXVIII: Millifiori, 82“x 82“, Paula Nadelstern (2013)

KALEIDOSCOPIC XXXVIII: Millifiori, 82“x 82“, Paula Nadelstern (2013)

How did you go about selecting threads for your Aurifil collection and what excites you most about the range that you are presenting?
My intent when selecting the colors for my Aurifil collection was like my goal when I design fabric for Benartex. I want to offer beautiful stuff that can be used in a myriad of ways for anyone’s piecing adventure, not just to be used to make kaleidoscopic designs. I welcome color and motif inspiration whenever I’m lucky enough to notice it: an elevator door, a set of Italian dishes, a painting at the Met, the arabesque patterns in the Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque on a teaching trip to Abu Dhabi.

deepgems-paulanadelstern

These charismatic and luminous jewel tones tickle my imagination. In fact, I plan to use DEEP GEMS as the inspiration for one of the colorways in my next fabric collection. I can’t wait to see what happens.

THE GIVEAWAY

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To enter-to-win 1 Large Deep Gems by Paula Nadelstern for Aurifil Thread Collection + 1 copy of Fabracadabra by Paula Nadelstern for C& T Publishing and 2 bundles of Kismet by Paula Nadelstern for Benartex , click here to head to the Rafflecopter entry page, or simply click on the image above. You do not have to complete all the options to be entered but the more options you choose, the more entries you have!  Entries will be accepted from now through 11:59pm Eastern Time on Wednesday, December 14! Winner will be randomly selected and announced here on Thursday, December 15. Good luck!

Update: This giveaway is now closed. Congratulations to our winner, Niraja Lorenz!

ABOUT PAULA
paula-profilePaula’s quilts have achieved international recognition for the innovative and complex designs inspired by the bilateral symmetry of kaleidoscopic images. Honored by inclusion in the Twentieth Century’s 100 Best American Quilts, her designs have inspired products including the vast carpet in the Hilton Americas hotel in Houston, TX and were showcased in the American Folk Art Museum’s first one person exhibition highlighting the work of a contemporary quilt artist (2009). In addition to numerous awards, Paula was a recipient of fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts and The Bronx Council on the Arts. She is the author of FABRACADABRA, Simple Quilts, Complex Fabric, Kaleidoscopes & Quilts, Snowflakes & Quilts, Puzzle Quilts: Simple Blocks, Complex Fabric, Paula Nadelstern’s Kaleidoscope Quilts: An Artist’s Journey Continues, and Kaleidoscope Quilts: The Workbook. She designs textile prints exclusively for Benartex, Inc. and lives in New York City with her husband, Eric. her daughter, Ariel, lives a block away. 

Learn more about Paula on her website — http://paulanadelstern.com/